Share this record

Contact Artefacts
please if you have any comments or more information regarding this record.

KALLENBACH, KENNEDY and FURNER

Established: 1928

Architect



List of Structures


References

The partnership between H KALLENBACH, AM KENNEDY and AS FURNER in Johannesburg from 1928. Late in 1928 Furner resigned his post as lecturer at the School of Architecture at the University of the Witwatersrand and joined Kallenbach and Kennedy as a junior partner. The firm built up an extensive practice throughout South Africa. According to Herbert (1975:48), 'the predominant influence in ... the office was undoubtedly Teutonic' which Herbert attributes to both Kallenbach's origins and Furner's admiration of German and Austrian architects. There were also two Austrian draughtsmen in the office, Fritz BERGE and Werner WAGNER, who assisted in the design of the Plaza Cinema and who surely added to this influence. According to Wagner (1990), Kallenbach was the head of the office and saw that work came in; Kennedy was the technical man and Furner the architect. The 1930s were a productive era for the partnership, the boom in the economy coinciding with Furner's arrival; Furner has been credited with the new and more modern image of the firm. In the Rand Daily Mail Exhibition (1934) the firm was responsible for transforming the Hall of Transport into an 'Ideal Village.'

Many South African architects worked at one time or other in the office of Kallenbach, Kennedy & Furner. Among these were TN DUNCAN (around 1934); CR FRIDJHON (in Durban from around 1931), BS COOKE (part-time from 1928 to 1931), W WAGNER and Fritz BERGE. In about 1929 RD MARTIENSSEN worked there briefly and WB PABST in 1935. The early records of the office of Kallenbach, Kennedy & Furner have not been kept.

(Cumming-George 1933; Greig 1971; Herbert 1975; Int Arch 1924-34, ub no 72:66; Lennard 1984; Rennie 1978b:16; SAAR Feb 1934; Wagner 1990)

Publ: The Plaza kinema, Johannesburg, SAAR Dec 1931:117-9 (no author).

All truncated references not fully cited in 'References' are those of Joanna Walker's original text and cited in full in the 'Bibliography' entry of the Lexicon.