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South African College

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The process that would lead to the formation of the South African College was started in 1791, when the Dutch Commissioner-General, Jacob Abraham Uitenhage de Mist, asked for money to be set aside to improve the schools in the Cape. When the British took over the control of the Cape Colony, under the first governor, Lord Charles Henry Somerset, permission was given for the money set aside by de Mist to be used to establish the South African College.

The founding committee met in the Groote Kerk to discuss funding and accommodation for the school and on October 1, 1829, the inauguration of the South African College was held and the classes began. The original location of the school was in the Weeshuis on Long Street and moved to what is now known as the Egyptian Building (on the Hiddingh Campus of UCT) in the Gardens district of Cape Town in 1841.

It was decided in 1874 that the younger students should be separated from their older counterparts. The South African College was separated into the College, which became the University of Cape Town; and the South African College School.

[Wikipedia]

Practitioners on this website connected with the South African College.

James Constantine ADAMSON He was co-founder of the South African College, where he was appointed professor of Mathematics and Physical Science.

George Sydney Herbert BRADFORD was educated at the South African College, Cape Town.

Alexander Lawrence CHAPMAN did a special course in the treatment of structures at the South African College, Cape Town in 1905.

Ronald Frederick Richard DAY was educated at the South African College School, Cape Town and at Kingswood College Grahamstown.

Gerard DE WITT was born in Cape Town and educated at Bedford Grammar School in England followed by the South African College.

Leonard Forbes McCONNELL was educated at the South African College School, Cape Town.

John Kilgour PARKER studied, from January 1912 to January 1913, at the South African College, studying civil engineering.

In 1906 Joseph Michael SOLOMON was attending evening classes in architecture which were being run by MASEY at the South African College.

Hubert John TANTON was educated at a Parktown Preparatory School, Johannesburg (1909-1918) and at the South African College, Cape Town (1918-1923).

On 8 April 1908 Prof H PAYNE presented a paper to the Cape Society of Civil Engineers on the theory of reinforced concrete design, reporting on tests carried out for the Public Works Department of the Cape Colony on reinforced concrete beams at the South African College (later the University of Cape Town and University of South Africa) in Cape Town where he served as professor of engineering.

In 1910 Alfred Ernest SNAPE was appointed to the Cape Town Corporation Chair of Civil Engineering at the South African College. He was later appointed professor of Civil Engineering at the University of Cape Town. The University of Cape Town named the new engineering block after him: The Snape Building.