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LAWSON, George Gavin

Born: 1882 05 27
Died: 1953 06 09

Architect


Year registered: 1927

Worked as an architect in South Africa from about 1905 until about 1913. He was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, and educated at Watson's College, Edinburgh and was subsequently articled to an Edinburgh architect, one Riley. Once in South Africa he worked in Johannesburg where he was still listed in 1915. He was briefly in partnership with David Joseph PARR (cf LAWSON and PARR). In about 1915 he left for Australia and served in the Australian Light Horse during the First World War. He did not return to South Africa. By 1924 he was practising in Adelaide, Australia, appointed assistant chief draughtsman in the office of the Architect-in-Chief in Adelaide. He registered with the Institute of South African Architects in 1927, however, which seems unusual in the circumstances and he retained an absentee membership of the Institute of South African Architects for a number of years.

For more information you can link to the Australian Architectural database Here. There is an error in third paragraph which should read Lawson married Edith McDowell DAVIES, a 28 year old bookbinder in Melbourne on 10 November 1920 (at St Silas, Albert Park).

(Building Jun 1918:164; Building Mar 1924:34; Cheeseman 1984, RIBA biog file; Lewis 1986; ISAA mem list; UTD 1915)

This entry has been updated and the link supplied by Sue Woods a genealogist in Melbourne.

There is also an entry in the Dictionary of Scottish Architects

All truncated references not fully cited in 'References' are those of Joanna Walker's original text and cited in full in the 'Bibliography' entry of the Lexicon.

Books citing LAWSON

ISAA. 1927. Register of Members the Institute of South African Architects. Johannesburg: ISAA (Unpublished Record). pp L8

Reps, John W. 1997. Canberra 1912 : Plans and planners of the Australian capital competition. Melbourne: Melbourne University Press. pp 154-155, 328-329